Skeptic Friends Network

Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?
Home | Forums | Active Topics | Active Polls | Register | FAQ | Contact Us  
  Connect: Chat | SFN Messenger | Buddy List | Members
Personalize: Profile | My Page | Forum Bookmarks  
 All Forums
 Our Skeptic Forums
 Health
 Why Are Doctors More Religious?
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly Bookmark this Topic BookMark Topic
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

leoofno
Skeptic Friend

USA
346 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  08:14:20  Show Profile Send leoofno a Private Message
I was reading a somewhat disturbing article regarding the number of doctors who would withhold information about treatments that conflicted with their moral beliefs (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17026169/) when I came across this quote:

"Curlin noted prior research by his team found doctors may be a bit more religious than others 46 percent of doctors said they attend religious services at least twice a month, compared with 40 percent of the general public."

I think that religion is a crock, that one's exposure to a good education and the development of critical thinking skills lessens the likelihood of religious belief. That seems borne out by statistics regarding scientists vs. the general population. This was discussed in a thread here recently.

Yet here we have very well educated segment of the population, doctors, who ought to know a thing or two about critical thinking, apparently being MORE religious than the general population.

I don't understand this. Are doctors onto something, or is there (probably) a more mundane explanation? I can think of two ideas:

1. The religious more likly to become doctors.
2. Doctors are more concerned with their "image", and so feel the need to go to services.

Any other ideas/comments?

"If you're not terrified, you're not paying attention." Eric Alterman

Edited by - leoofno on 02/08/2007 08:15:32

Gorgo
SFN Die Hard

USA
5310 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  08:26:14   [Permalink]  Show Profile Send Gorgo a Private Message
They go to church more often. That doesn't necessarily equate to being more religious, so I wonder if it's the second choice. Might be that GP's need to go to satisfy their public.

I know the rent is in arrears
The dog has not been fed in years
It's even worse than it appears
But it's alright-
Jerry Garcia
Robert Hunter



Go to Top of Page

tomk80
SFN Regular

Netherlands
1278 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  10:43:50   [Permalink]  Show Profile  Visit tomk80's Homepage Send tomk80 a Private Message
Perhaps 3: They come in contact with human suffering more often and hence are more prone to develop coping mechanisms, of which religion might be one?

What I would find interesting in this respect would be a comparison of other emergency-service personel. Data on the religious distribution of first-year medical students might also be interesting.

Tom

`Contrariwise,' continued Tweedledee, `if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn't, it ain't. That's logic.'
-Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Caroll-
Go to Top of Page

BigPapaSmurf
SFN Die Hard

3192 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  11:06:50   [Permalink]  Show Profile Send BigPapaSmurf a Private Message
It has solely to do with the belief that humans are the most precious thing in the universe. See Ishmael

Edit:Well, maybe not solely...

"...things I have neither seen nor experienced nor heard tell of from anybody else; things, what is more, that do not in fact exist and could not ever exist at all. So my readers must not believe a word I say." -Lucian on his book True History

"...They accept such things on faith alone, without any evidence. So if a fraudulent and cunning person who knows how to take advantage of a situation comes among them, he can make himself rich in a short time." -Lucian critical of early Christians c.166 AD From his book, De Morte Peregrini
Edited by - BigPapaSmurf on 02/08/2007 11:07:59
Go to Top of Page

beskeptigal
SFN Die Hard

USA
3834 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  14:45:16   [Permalink]  Show Profile Send beskeptigal a Private Message
Depends if the data was correct. Could be any number of flaws in the survey.


Go to Top of Page

Neurosis
SFN Regular

USA
675 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2007 :  15:14:20   [Permalink]  Show Profile  Send Neurosis an AOL message Send Neurosis a Private Message
I agree with Tom. I also think that is has alot to do with field of study. Doctors are not taught to be critical any more than any other science group. Instead, they are taught diagnostics. How to recognize the signs of a disease or physical problem and what to do when they present. Basically, I think that anyone can need reassurance that life has a point, the universe had an origin, and that the suffering they see (especially true of a physician like an oncologist)will be reconciled somehow.

We should also recognize that this is American doctors most likely.

Facts! Pssh, you can prove anything even remotely true with facts.
- Homer Simpson

[God] is an infinite nothing from nowhere with less power over our universe than the secretary of agriculture.
- Prof. Frink

Lisa: Yes, but wouldn't you rather know the truth than to delude yourself for happiness?
Marge: Well... um.... [goes outside to jump on tampoline with Homer.]
Edited by - Neurosis on 02/08/2007 15:15:12
Go to Top of Page

beskeptigal
SFN Die Hard

USA
3834 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2007 :  01:57:19   [Permalink]  Show Profile Send beskeptigal a Private Message
How do you know that, Neurosis? It may have been true in the past but currently there's a big movement toward critical thinking in medicine. I see critical thinking reflected in many medical settings but especially in how current research implications are considered.

If you have the time, watch these 2 medical conferences (1 hr each). See if the research results as presented aren't indeed being interpreted in a most critical way.

Alzheimer's Disease Part 1

Part 2


Edited by - beskeptigal on 02/09/2007 01:57:52
Go to Top of Page

Ricky
SFN Die Hard

USA
4907 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2007 :  08:52:29   [Permalink]  Show Profile  Send Ricky an AOL message Send Ricky a Private Message
quote:
How do you know that, Neurosis? It may have been true in the past but currently there's a big movement toward critical thinking in medicine. I see critical thinking reflected in many medical settings but especially in how current research implications are considered.



Are you saying that you think the study was performed improperly?

Why continue? Because we must. Because we have the call. Because it is nobler to fight for rationality without winning than to give up in the face of continued defeats. Because whatever true progress humanity makes is through the rationality of the occasional individual and because any one individual we may win for the cause may do more for humanity than a hundred thousand who hug their superstitions to their breast.
- Isaac Asimov
Go to Top of Page

Neurosis
SFN Regular

USA
675 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2007 :  11:04:40   [Permalink]  Show Profile  Send Neurosis an AOL message Send Neurosis a Private Message
quote:

How do you know that, Neurosis? It may have been true in the past but currently there's a big movement toward critical thinking in medicine. I see critical thinking reflected in many medical settings but especially in how current research implications are considered.




I did not mean to say that doctors are not critical, I meant that they are taught a repetoire of cause and effect lines for them to reason through to get a diagnosis and treatment. I am saying that thinking critically about one subject does not mean you can think critically about another. I am a medical student and what I have been taught is how the body should work and how to know when it is not working properly, and familiarizing myself with presentations of the problems that could be causing the improper function or lack of it. There is nothing wrong with the workings of the planet, no cause and effect lines to consider. It isn't the same thinking process to me. In order to be an atheist, to me, means considering only what is relevant and has evidence. As a doctor, one can rule out a problem with the kidneys for lack of evidence but you still must keep thinkig about what is the problem and how to tell if there is none. It is a difference that I can see making all the difference when trying to compare professions to atheist trends. The god question is not a problem, it is a non-issue, so problem solving skills may not help with getting past it, similar to a intuitive riddle like the following:

A thousand pound pyramid is balnced on the tip, under which is 100 dollar bill. How do you get the bill?

The answer is to rip the bill, but an engineer is no more capable of solving the riddle than a regular construction worker, or anyone else really. I think it is a similar situation.

Facts! Pssh, you can prove anything even remotely true with facts.
- Homer Simpson

[God] is an infinite nothing from nowhere with less power over our universe than the secretary of agriculture.
- Prof. Frink

Lisa: Yes, but wouldn't you rather know the truth than to delude yourself for happiness?
Marge: Well... um.... [goes outside to jump on tampoline with Homer.]
Edited by - Neurosis on 02/09/2007 11:05:12
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly Bookmark this Topic BookMark Topic
Jump To:

The mission of the Skeptic Friends Network is to promote skepticism, critical thinking, science and logic as the best methods for evaluating all claims of fact, and we invite active participation by our members to create a skeptical community with a wide variety of viewpoints and expertise.


Home | Skeptic Forums | Skeptic Summary | The Kil Report | Creation/Evolution | Rationally Speaking | Skeptillaneous | About Skepticism | Fan Mail | Claims List | Calendar & Events | Skeptic Links | Book Reviews | Gift Shop | SFN on Facebook | Staff | Contact Us

Skeptic Friends Network
© 2008 Skeptic Friends Network Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.14 seconds.
Powered by @tomic Studio
Snitz Forums 2000