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the_ignored
SFN Addict

2557 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2009 :  08:08:50  Show Profile Send the_ignored a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Only time and research will tell. In the meantime, here's the story

Twelve thousand photographs with precise times and dates are neatly catalogued in his files.

What he found:


The central cairn is surrounded by 28 radiating stone lines, four of which align with the cardinal points of the compass. Those lines are encircled by another ring of stones.

A few metres away lies a stone semicircle, with a large stone between it and the central cairn. The left edge of the semicircle lines up with both the central stone and the right edge of the cairn, and vice versa.


To Freeman, those features represent the sun, the crescent moon and the morning star.

As well, there are secondary cairns on nearby hills and rock assemblages that seem to correspond to constellations.


And after years of rising before dawn, in all seasons and weather, to carefully photograph the positions of the sun, Freeman found the rocks once thought to be simply strewn across the prairie instead mark the progression of the year with uncanny accuracy.

The rising and setting sun on both the longest and shortest days of the year lines up precisely with V-shaped sights in the temple's rocks. The spring and autumn equinoxes, when day and night are equal, are similarly marked. They are not the equinoxes of the Gregorian calendar currently used, however, but the true astronomical equinoxes.

Freeman is convinced the temple contains a lunar calendar as well, because the 28 rays radiating from the central cairn correspond to the length of the lunar cycle.

>From: enuffenuff@fastmail.fm
(excerpt follows):
> I'm looking to teach these two bastards a lesson they'll never forget.
> Personal visit by mates of mine. No violence, just a wee little chat.
>
> **** has also committed more crimes than you can count with his
> incitement of hatred against a religion. That law came in about 2007
> much to ****'s ignorance. That is fact and his writing will become well
> know as well as him becoming a publicly known icon of hatred.
>
> Good luck with that fuckwit. And Reynold, fucking run, and don't stop.
> Disappear would be best as it was you who dared to attack me on my
> illness knowing nothing of the cause. You disgust me and you are top of
> the list boy. Again, no violence. Just regular reminders of who's there
> and visits to see you are behaving. Nothing scary in reality. But I'd
> still disappear if I was you.

What brought that on? this. Original posting here.

Another example of this guy's lunacy here.

filthy
SFN Die Hard

USA
14408 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2009 :  08:54:48   [Permalink]  Show Profile Send filthy a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Originally posted by the_ignored

Only time and research will tell. In the meantime, here's the story

Twelve thousand photographs with precise times and dates are neatly catalogued in his files.

What he found:


The central cairn is surrounded by 28 radiating stone lines, four of which align with the cardinal points of the compass. Those lines are encircled by another ring of stones.

A few metres away lies a stone semicircle, with a large stone between it and the central cairn. The left edge of the semicircle lines up with both the central stone and the right edge of the cairn, and vice versa.


To Freeman, those features represent the sun, the crescent moon and the morning star.

As well, there are secondary cairns on nearby hills and rock assemblages that seem to correspond to constellations.


And after years of rising before dawn, in all seasons and weather, to carefully photograph the positions of the sun, Freeman found the rocks once thought to be simply strewn across the prairie instead mark the progression of the year with uncanny accuracy.

The rising and setting sun on both the longest and shortest days of the year lines up precisely with V-shaped sights in the temple's rocks. The spring and autumn equinoxes, when day and night are equal, are similarly marked. They are not the equinoxes of the Gregorian calendar currently used, however, but the true astronomical equinoxes.

Freeman is convinced the temple contains a lunar calendar as well, because the 28 rays radiating from the central cairn correspond to the length of the lunar cycle.

While I agree that genius existed amongst aboriginals 'way back then -- the Maya and Aztec astronomers are examples -- I must look at this with some skepticism. I think it needs some study by qualified outside observers.

Be great if it worked out, though.




"What luck for rulers that men do not think." -- Adolf Hitler (1889 - 1945)

"If only we could impeach on the basis of criminal stupidity, 90% of the Rethuglicans and half of the Democrats would be thrown out of office." ~~ P.Z. Myres


"The default position of human nature is to punch the other guy in the face and take his stuff." ~~ Dude

Brother Boot Knife of Warm Humanitarianism,

and Crypto-Communist!

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HalfMooner
Dingaling

Philippines
15831 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2009 :  11:09:29   [Permalink]  Show Profile Send HalfMooner a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm very skeptical. Not skeptical that Native Americans 5,000 years ago were capable of making precise astronomical observations, but skeptical that an early hunter-gatherer culture both did so and set up a vast network of markers over 26 square kilometers.

There is probably some basic astronomical alignment to the medicine wheels, but I think Freeman is seeing further elaborated details that spring much more from his expectations than from evidence.

I don't doubt Freeman's honesty, or that Freeman found precise and detailed alignments of stones in many astronomically significant directions. If you look hard enough for something like that, you'll usually be able to find something that will convince you.

The human brain tends to impose order upon random patterns. This section of the Wiki article on so-called "Ley Lines" shows how easy it is to find "intentional" patterns in random map data. Wiki's graphic shows how "trivial" it is to locate very convincing alignments. I think something of that sort has gotten Freeman excited.


Biology is just physics that has begun to smell bad.” —HalfMooner
Here's a link to Moonscape News, and one to its Archive.
Edited by - HalfMooner on 01/31/2009 11:24:09
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